A week ago, I attended in Cape Town, South Africa, the launch of the Southern African Venture Capital Association (SAVCA)’s 2019 Venture Capital Industry covering the 2018 calendar and its investment activity across South Africa. Since 2017, this is the association’s third consecutive year of publishing the survey, in previous years, the results would published every two to three years, which means that means that more growth is occurring in the industry and that coherently, more data has become available. Let’s unpack the landscape a bit, and understand what continues to make South Africa one of the primary hotspots for early stage investing in startups across the continent.

A total of 181 new deals were recorded in 2018, increasing by 13.8% from 2017; with the top five industries owing to deals invested mainly by value in manufacturing at 14.2% and food and beverage coming in 12.3%, medical devices and equipment at 10.5%, with energy at 10.2% and just missing the ten percentile at 7.2% is the business products and services sector. Manufacturing and energy still dominated in the market share of deals invested by number of deals, with consumer products, software and fintech specific portfolios joining them in the top five industries invested in. If anything, this shows the large investment opportunity in diversification of sectors outside digital and e-commerce, and also, brings to light the conversation around the harsh imbalance in and opportunities for other sectors like biotechnology and agriculture to break through.

 

The Western Cape headquarted investees dominate the pie at 48.2% of deals, with Gauteng coming in second at 42.5% and followed by Kwazulu-Natal at 6.8%, which has grown its activity and share in the ecosystem immensely since 2017. The rest of South Africa and non-South Africa firms total the transactions at 2.5%. The incremental growth that Kwazulu-Natal has shown, is a positive indicator of the diversification of location, from R13 million in 2015 of total deal investments to R71 million in 2018. Although the volume and value of deals increased in 2018 from the previous year, the distribution of equity preferences over the years is quite the opposite narrative. Expectantly so, due to the new deals being made, 74.5% of investors hold a 0-25% stake in these startup ventures, an increase in 2017’s results at 54.3% in equity. The second category of equity sits between 25-50% which has also subsequently decreased at 10.6% in 2018 as compared to 25.5% in 2017. The results owed to this data could either result in exits, new fund management firms created, new startup entrants who have no follow up funding and/or investors seeding a volume of investments in ventures that require much more startup and growth capital than other forms of capital post the growth stage – it’s also reported that a total of 79% of deals concluded in 2018 were for investments R10 million or less, with an average deal size of R8.3 million.

 

With the bigge deals concluded by Captive Government (funds primarily sourced from a government department or public body) and Captive Corporate (funds primarily sourced from a corporate entity such as a listed company) investors and amounting to R492 million (more than the five biggest deals in 2017 which totalled R315 million) who combined, make up 48.4% of fund management types. The rest of the types of management are fund sourced from family offices, independent funds and the smallest fund management makeup are angel investors at 4.2%. The composition of fund management also highlights something that the data doesn’t show, the gender and race that I’ve no doubt, through mechanisms like the introduction of the Section 12J tax incentive to introduce more players in the industry. As transparent and apparent as the situation of parity is in the ecosystem as investors and investees is, it’s important to highlight so as to better inform decisions made by the investors, as well as government’s role in introducing policy to level the playing field.

 

There’s much opportunity to diversify the industry, with not only location and sectors but also race and through gender as with the curated list that I created showcasing the data and campaigns geared towards listening to the gender of higher Return On Investment (ROI) in their capital. Repeat investments are a great indication of good faith in business, industry must afford transparency through these transactions beyond high-level number of exits and different types of investment activities that are great for panel-lead conversations, however, in order to bring true transformation, supporting the formation of firms like Dazzle Angels, AlphaCode and Africa Trust Group and SAVCA’s Fund Manager Development Programme are the kinds of mechanisms that we need to drive and actualise the opportunities that are untapped in the market.

 

Here’s to looking forward to results of accelerated and diversified growth of South Africa’s VC industry in 2019!

                                           

 

Published in Inno trep tech

TWO MONTHS OF NO BLOGGING …

Wednesday, 22 August 2018

     It’s been a while since I’ve posted on the website, and between work, school and the new role with Circle of Young Intrapreneurs as Chapter Lead, an incredible global organisation for young intrapreneurs, it’s been a tough balance but I want to thank you for the continued support and constant resharing and engagement with the content. As such, I thought it only fair to share on some of the activities that’s been keeping me busy on these streets which includes some speaking, mentoring and some contributions on other platforms. 

Some speaking engagements included:

1.       Facilitating the Cape Innovation Technology Initiative Tech Skills Readiness Programme with their Software Engineering cohort as they embark on their careers. This is a great programme that looks at aspiring software engineering students largely from previously disadvantaged backgrounds, and seeds knowledge and skills so as to cultivate the STEM future workforce for South Africa! An incredible knowledge sharing afternoon it was.

2.       When this email came into my inbox, I couldn’t stop beaming. It was the Desmond and Leah Tutu Legacy Foundation and what made me happier was the request to mentor for the day and share my journey was with their Youth@Work and their 60 phenomenal young women, who looked like me and came from the same township and a desire for knowledge and access was there. The opportunity was to engage with these young women on finding employment and choosing a career path – which as we all know how intimidating it can be when you’re still in your late teens. I’m so honoured to be able to get the constant opportunity to engage with young, black women and use my platform for such, to empower with information and access more than anything - be it through work or otherwise. I was left inspired ?

3.       About two weeks ago, I flew to Pretoria to facilitate a panel discussion on Power and Influence of Young Trailblazers in Corporate and Business that had fellow One Young World Ambassador Farai Mubaiwa on the panel. The Young Corporate Leader‘s Women’s Day celebrations included a keynote addresses by Ipeleng Mkhari and Dr Matete Madiba, just to mention a few of the phenomenal women who got to use their platforms and engage with us. Well done to fellow Ambassador Kamogelo Lesabe for pulling this stunning event together with your team ?

4.       I really do enjoy spending my time with my peers and those even younger, especially still in their teens and impressionable when it comes to making impactful decisions like what subject choices and the career choices that are available for their choosing – of course the bias in me leans towards STEM careers, especially in the age of the Fourth Industrial Revolution. I got to have some time with these students at the University of the Western Cape (UWC) recently. Mmaki Jantjies, Head of Information Systems at UWC shared the experience.

                         

Although I haven’t been active on my platform, I’ve had the opportunity to engage with Mzukisi Qobo who is the Associate Professor at SARChI, Chair of African Diplomacy and Foreign Policy, University of Johannesburg on his podcast. In it, we looked at the role of Venture Capital as well as other ingredients for start-up success in South Africa, which can be found in this link - https://soundcloud.com/mzukisiq/start-up-opportunities-and-venture-capital , aswell as a feature on Daily Maverick on South Africa’s Silent Start-Up Revolution which he authoured

https://www.dailymaverick.co.za/opinionista/2018-07-02-south-africas-silent-start-up-revolution/ .

One the most impactful and growing technology entrepreneurial schools in Africa is Meltwater Entrepreneurial School of Technology (MEST), which over the years has premise in Ghana and recently Nigeria and South Africa, with plans to launch in Ivory Coast and Kenya soon. I had the opportunity to host a session on Open Innovation and Community Building at one of their Community Conversations in Cape Town, as well as share some of the nuggets from the experience and my journey as a junior executive in corporate innovation-  https://meltwater.org/open-innovation-and-community-building-with-vuyolwethu-dubese/

 

In addition to the speaking engagements, I’ve been fortunate enough to be invited to be a part of Creative Nestlings What It Takes book with 59 other young creative Africans, I get to talk about the art of leverage when it comes to social capital. The book is currently available on pre-order on bit.ly/PreorderBookWIT .

 

                                        

                                  

 

 

 

Published in Life Style

My name is Vuyolwethu Dubese and I am 23 year old Girl in Media and Technology, exploring Innovation, Intelligence, Inclusion and Entrepreneurship. With a focus on African technology and entrepreneurship, the intent is to be a part of the ecosystem and organisations driven to develop the African lives and the narratives that are shape shifters in how Africans and the world perceive the continent.

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